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ExoMars first images
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    Mars close-up
    Mars close-up

    Close-up of the rim of a large unnamed crater north of a crater named Da Vinci, situated near the Mars equator. A smaller, 1.4 km-diameter crater is seen in the rim along the left hand side of the image. The image scale is 7.2 m/pixel.

    The image was taken on 22 November 2016 and is one of the first acquired by the Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) onboard the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter. The image was taken as part of an eight-day campaign to test the science instruments for the first time since arriving at the Red Planet on 19 October.

    Credits: ESA/Roscosmos/ExoMars/CaSSIS/UniBE, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
    Arsia Chasmata
    Arsia Chasmata

    A 25 km-wide image strip over a structure called Arsia Chasmata, which lies on the flank of the large volcano Arsia Mons. The formation is volcanic in origin and many pit craters, possibly caused by subsidence, can be seen.

    The image was taken on 22 November 2016 and is one of the first acquired by the Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) onboard the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter. The image was taken as part of an eight-day campaign to test the science instruments for the first time since arriving at the Red Planet on 19 October.

    Credits: ESA/Roscosmos/ExoMars/CaSSIS/UniBE; mosaicking tool: AutoStitch (University of British Columbia)., CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
    First ExoMars stereo reconstruction
    First ExoMars stereo reconstruction

    The first stereo reconstruction of a small area in a region called Noctis Labyrinthus. The image gives an altitude map of the region with a resolution of less than 20 m. 

    The images used to make the 3D profile were taken on 22 November 2016 and are among the first to be acquired by the Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter. The images were taken as part of an eight-day campaign to test the science instruments for the first time since arriving at the Red Planet on 19 October.

    Credits: ESA/Roscosmos/ExoMars/CaSSIS/UniBE, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
    ExoMars first colour image of Phobos
    ExoMars first colour image of Phobos

    Colour composite of Phobos taken with the ExoMars orbiter’s Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) on 26 November 2016. The observation was made at a distance of 7700 km and yields a resolution of 87 m/pixel.

    To create the final colour image, two images were taken through each of the four colour filters of the camera – panchromatic, blue–green, red and infrared – and then stitched together and combined to produce the high-resolution composite.

    Two of the colour filters used by CaSSIS lie outside the wavelength response of the human eye, so this is not a ‘true’ colour image. However, showing the data as a colour representation can reveal details of the surface mineralogy. Different colours are clearly seen, with the bluest part in the direction of the large crater Stickney, which is out of view over the limb to the left. Although the exact composition of the material is unknown, the colour differences are thought to be caused by compositional variations on scales of hundreds of metres to several kilometres.

    Credits: ESA/Roscosmos/CaSSIS, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
    Phobos in 3D
    Phobos in 3D

    A red–blue anaglyph image of Phobos composed from the stereo pair acquired by the ExoMars orbiter’s Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) on 26 November 2016. The image should be viewed using red-blue 3D glasses.

    Credits: ESA/Roscosmos/CaSSIS, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
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    First images from ExoMars

    A showcase of some of the first and highest resolution images acquired by the Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter on 22 November 2016.

    The first image sequence shown was taken at a distance of 5300 km with a resolution of 60 m/pixel, about 44 minutes before closest approach. It illustrates how CaSSIS acquires data by taking images in colour simultaneously: at panchromatic, red, near-infrared and blue wavelengths.

    A 3D reconstruction of a small area in Noctis Labyrinthus is also presented, based on a stereo pair of images taken, and presented with an altitude map with a resolution of less than 20 m.

    Next, a spectacular high-resolution image sequence acquired during closest approach of 235 km altitude is presented. At this time, the spacecraft was flying over the Hebes Chasma region. The highest resolution data acquired is at 2.8 m/pixel. The flyover is shown at half the speed at which the data were acquired.

    Then, an image swath about 25 km wide is shown of Arisa Chasmata, which is located on the flanks of a large volcano on Mars named Arsia Mons.

    Finally, a close up of a 1.4 km-diameter crater sitting in the rim of a much larger crater near the Mars equator is presented. This image was acquired at 7.2 m/pixel.

    This video was produced by the CaSSIS camera team and the University of Bern.

    Credits: ESA/Roscosmos/ExoMars/CaSSIS/UniBE, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO

    ExoMars first images

    First images taken by the ExoMars orbiter during instrument testing at Mars